Gayest Excerpt Ever

Well, sorta, haha…

Here’s a snippet from the third book, where Ion gains sight of something he never even knew could be seen. It’s definitely a spoiler alert, so don’t read ahead if you’re not down for that sort of thang. But for those of you who are….ENJOY! And don’t forget to get your copy here! And add my Facebook and twitter!

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Chapter Twenty-Three

The Thunder Lord

Mearic and I clung to the window of his chamber, our eyes fixed on the army in the distance.

Sol was so eerily quiet I could almost hear the rash of bumps rising on my arms and neck. The front line of the army was a row of ants on the desert hill beyond the gates. They were too far for me to make any of them out, but my ears were buzzing now more than ever. And I knew where the buzzing was coming from. Among those soldiers was Lillian…Theo…my sister. What were they going to do if we faced one another? What was I going to do?

My chest tightened at the thought. Triplets save me.

In the middle of the front lines, I could make out some of the soldiers shuffling about, parting as a large object was rolled forward. A small glimmer of light twinkled off its rounded edges. Metal.

“Come,” I told Mearic, eyes still fixed on the glimmer. “We must join your father.”

I’m not sure why, but I grabbed Mearic’s hand without even a thought, rushing us to the lift. It was only when the platform shifted and rushed upward that I realized I still had his hand in mine. I looked down at our interlaced fingers—as he’d been doing—and quickly pulled away.

“Uh, sorry,” I said, warmth rising in my cheeks.

Silence fell, and then I felt his hand slip back into mine. I looked at him, and slowly, that smile that reminded me so much of my mother’s parted his lips. His kind of…pretty lips. In that moment, with the wind in our ears, and our eyes locked, we said so much to each other. I told him of how he reminded me of my mother and her gentle, caring nature. I told him that he’d been the only person to make me laugh in over a year. I told him of my plans. And I told him that I’d protect him at all costs.

I tightened my other hand into a fist. At all costs.

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Why Giving Away Free Books is Essential

I’ve read a lot of articles on this matter, and I’ve come to the conclusion that as an indie author, there can be no greater first step to getting your book out there than giving away free copies. I know, I know…”I put soooo much work into this book, I deserve to get money for everyone I sell!” Well, stop complaining. Seriously, no one likes a complainer. It’s, like, a fact.

The truth is, you don’t deserve the people’s money…at least not yet. You must first prove yourself.

That’s right: prove yourself. If that sounded like the objective of the level on that video game you’ve never been able to finish and win, then we’re on the same page…er, level. Listen, over the past (nearly) five days, I’ve sold upwards of 400 copies of my book. They were free copies, yes, but the exposure I’ve gotten from them has been tremendous and the fact that it graced the top ten bestsellers list of multiple children’s ebooks categories on Amazon awarded me even MORE exposure. I mean, The Iron-Jawed Boy shared the same page as Lewis Carrol’s Alice in Wonderland; it doesn’t get much more badass than that. Now, that’s not to say giving out free ebooks is a good thing for everyone, because if you’ve written a baaaad book, you can expect to get baaaad reviews AND you didn’t even get the satisfaction of having those bad reviews come, at least, from royalties. In that respect, no, giving out free ebooks is not advised, lol.

If you have, however, written an awesome book (or even a mediocre one), the exposure is VITAL to your mission. Just think about it: those 400-some people who got your book for free might very well recommend the book to others, write a review, OR even buy the paperback for their kids or family or friends when Christmas rolls around. The amount of people reached could potentially be tremendous!

Lastly, mentality is everything. It’s very important, at least in my opinion, to understand that you’re not going to be making much of anything off your books in the first couple years, unless of course you’re releasing a few books over the course of a year or shorter (I’ve seen SO many success stories that were based on those tactics). And it’s IMPERATIVE that you come to terms with that. Impatience leads to mistakes; mistakes that can’t be rewritten.